Eastern box turtle

Eastern box turtle

Filtrer et trier

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In the state of Indiana, a species of hinge-shelled turtle known as the Eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina) can be found living in woodland environments. Box turtles have a lengthy lifespan, a sluggish rate of maturation, and a low annual reproductive rate. This, in conjunction with the high death rate of box turtles as a result of being hit by vehicles, has led to the Eastern box turtle being listed as a species of special concern in the state of Indiana. Box turtles in Indiana are benefiting from ongoing study that is being conducted by the Wildlife Science Staff and is being financed by the Indiana Nongame Wildlife Fund. It is very necessary for individuals to contribute to the Nongame Wildlife Fund in order for this study to proceed.

  • Small to medium-sized turtle with a 4.5-to-6-inch domed shell.
  • The carapace has yellow to orange streaks and spots on a black/brown/gray background.
  • Plastron might be yellow, brown, black, or a mixture. The plastron's hinge lets the turtle "box" itself against predators.
  • The turtle's body may also be marked.
  • Males have red eyes, females brown.
  • Box turtles' beaks are horned.
  • Shell is linked to ribcage permanently.
  • Box turtles have small, webbed limbs.
  • Eastern box turtles can live 60 years. Over 100-year-old specimens are possible.